Community
If You Live Or Work Near Our Pipelines

If you live or work near one of our pipelines it’s important to know how to recognize signs of a leak and what to do if you suspect one near you.

To identify the exact location of a pipeline before digging, call 811 to reach your local One-Call Center.

Pipeline markers are located along the pipeline route, at road and railroad crossings and at all aboveground facilities.

Markers identify the general area but not the exact location or depth of the pipeline. They specify the type of product transported, the operator’s name and an emergency contact number.



The federal government also provides maps that show the approximate location of transmission pipelines in your community through the National Pipeline Mapping System.

NPMS

To view maps visit the National Pipeline Mapping System.


You can also visit our Interactive Pipeline Website for maps of our Tallgrass system.

Government and safety officials can also request an electronic data file.

Pipelines Near Your Home or Business

Do you have a family or business evacuation plan in the unlikely event of a pipeline leak or rupture?

Ensure the safety of your family, employees and protect your property by familiarizing yourself with the location of pipelines near your home or business and by knowing how to identify, respond to and prevent a leak or rupture.

Pipelines Near your Farm or Ranch

Do you always call One-Call before initiating any type of deep excavation activity?

Farm and ranch equipment is a common source of pipeline damage and can cause loss of life and property. Deep excavation activity including plowing, tilling, terracing, subsoiling or installing a fence can endanger underground pipelines.

Farmers and ranchers can protect their family, employees and property by verifying the location of pipelines before excavating and by knowing how to identify, respond to and prevent a leak or rupture.

Pipelines Near your School

Do you know where underground pipelines are located near your school?

School personnel working near a Tallgrass pipeline are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the pipeline's path and to develop safety and evacuation procedures that address response to a suspected pipeline leak or rupture.

Pipelines in your Comunity

Are you prepared to respond to a pipeline leak or rupture?

Ensure the safety of your community by familiarizing yourself with the location of pipelines and by knowing how to identify, respond to and prevent a pipeline leak or rupture.

Tallgrass has a solid safety record and is prepared to respond to and manage any disruptions that may occur. However, a pipeline incident can be dangerous and requires caution and immediate action.

In emergency situations, Tallgrass priorities are the same as yours—protect life, property and the environment.

In addition to 24-hour monitoring and ongoing safety and security procedures, Tallgrass relies on local government and safety officials to notify Tallgrass when you observe potential right-of-way restriction violations or potential damage to our facilities, which could endanger public safety.

Pipelines Near Your Job Site

Do you always call One-Call before beginning an excavation project?

Excavation activity is the most common source of serious pipeline damage and can cause loss of life and property.

Protect your employees, equipment and company reputation by verifying the location of pipelines and underground utilities before you dig and by knowing how to identify, respond to and prevent a pipeline leak or rupture.

Contractor Safety Resources

Contractor Safety Forms

Contractor Safety Contact

Brian Mendenhall
EHS Sr. Specialist
Tallgrass Energy
Kearney, NE
Tel: (308) 865-0714
Email: Brian.Mendenhall@tallgrassenergylp.com